Kiosque:
There were nothing but grey skies over the kiosque at the Jules Joffrin métro stop across from the Mairie in the 18th earlier today.  The cover of GQ Magazine, featuring retired French soccer star Zinédine Zidane, looked back at the glory days of the French football team, known in France simply as Les Bleus. But the lead headline of Le Parisien wondered if the current team should be penalized for their poor behavior during the Euro Cup 2012 quarter-finals.  It is still to be determined whether the whole team will be punished, but it is nearly certain that Samir Nasri, who normally plays for Manchester City, will face retribution for the nasty comments he made to a journalist followingthe match last Saturday when Le Bleus lost to Spain.

The main headlines of Le Figaro focused on the intersection of top French political officials with their worldly counterparts.  On the one hand, the daily paper featured the arrival of Burmese political activist and newly elected parliamentary representative, Aung San Suu Kyi, for a three-day visit to the French capital.  Le Figaro also made reference to the upcoming European Summit to discuss the financial crisis by announcing a working dinner scheduled for this evening between French President Hollande and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.  Apparently the German leader had already shown her cards by announcing late Tuesday that she will neither support the pooling of debt nor the creation of Eurobonds for “as long as she lives.”  Whether she sticks to her guns or is persuaded by President Hollande and others to relax her position will be revealed in the coming days.

Domestic issues were the order of the day at Libération where the main headline imagines French police asking themselves what  Manuel Valls, the new Minister of the Interior, will do now that he is in charge.  During his campaign, President Hollande called for a new set of rules to improve the relationship between the police and French citizens, which had degraded during the Sarkozy years, but that puts Valls in the awkward position of having to enact reform while also keeping the police force relatively appeased.  So far the French police seem to be cautiously optimistic about Valls’s pronouncements.
— Courtney Delaunay (uneamericaine.tumblr.com)

Kiosque:

There were nothing but grey skies over the kiosque at the Jules Joffrin métro stop across from the Mairie in the 18th earlier today.  The cover of GQ Magazine, featuring retired French soccer star Zinédine Zidane, looked back at the glory days of the French football team, known in France simply as Les Bleus. But the lead headline of Le Parisien wondered if the current team should be penalized for their poor behavior during the Euro Cup 2012 quarter-finals.  It is still to be determined whether the whole team will be punished, but it is nearly certain that Samir Nasri, who normally plays for Manchester City, will face retribution for the nasty comments he made to a journalist followingthe match last Saturday when Le Bleus lost to Spain.

The main headlines of Le Figaro focused on the intersection of top French political officials with their worldly counterparts.  On the one hand, the daily paper featured the arrival of Burmese political activist and newly elected parliamentary representative, Aung San Suu Kyi, for a three-day visit to the French capital.  Le Figaro also made reference to the upcoming European Summit to discuss the financial crisis by announcing a working dinner scheduled for this evening between French President Hollande and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.  Apparently the German leader had already shown her cards by announcing late Tuesday that she will neither support the pooling of debt nor the creation of Eurobonds for “as long as she lives.”  Whether she sticks to her guns or is persuaded by President Hollande and others to relax her position will be revealed in the coming days.

Domestic issues were the order of the day at Libération where the main headline imagines French police asking themselves what  Manuel Valls, the new Minister of the Interior, will do now that he is in charge.  During his campaign, President Hollande called for a new set of rules to improve the relationship between the police and French citizens, which had degraded during the Sarkozy years, but that puts Valls in the awkward position of having to enact reform while also keeping the police force relatively appeased.  So far the French police seem to be cautiously optimistic about Valls’s pronouncements.

— Courtney Delaunay (uneamericaine.tumblr.com)

Self-Portraits of the French Presidential Candidates: This copy of Le Parisien was open on the “zinc” where we had a sandwich today. The candidates were asked to take pictures of themselves in front of a camera on a tripod with studio lighting. All complied. But some clearly enjoyed the experience more than others. Marine Le Pen “was transformed in front of the lens,” writes Le Parisien. Hollande looked confident, or at least well coached. Sarkozy … Well, Sarkozy wasn’t happy about the whole thing: “What’s this photo session? I don’t much like this, you know.” Despite urging from an aide to get with the game, Sarkozy stood there stone solemn, squeezed off two pictures, and left.

KIOSQUE:
Still feels like a chilly printemps (spring) in Paris, but the much-harassed meteorologists assure us it will get better in August (strike one for the aoûtiens over the juilletistes). One telltale sign of a French summer, though, believe it or not, is Le Point eschewing news to put a long-dead philosopher on its cover. This week: Friedrich Nietzsche. Nothing says summer like Nietzsche, we always say.
Paris Match has Amy Winehouse. Le Nouvel Obs has Anders Behring Breivik. Le Parisien, more serious than usual, focuses on famine in the Horn of Africa. Libération flags French hypocrisy on African dictators rich real estate holdings on French soil. And Libé, with the headline, “DSK, the Impossible Return,” notes that Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s friends have given up on the idea he will return and become president, given unfavorable timing and that he’ll have to recuperate from his ordeal even if all charges are dropped. Le Figaro highlights a new effort to slash tax havens to cut the deficit. And Le Monde this afternoon leads on a big surprise jump in the jobless rate, after disappointing figures released last night.

KIOSQUE:

Still feels like a chilly printemps (spring) in Paris, but the much-harassed meteorologists assure us it will get better in August (strike one for the aoûtiens over the juilletistes). One telltale sign of a French summer, though, believe it or not, is Le Point eschewing news to put a long-dead philosopher on its cover. This week: Friedrich Nietzsche. Nothing says summer like Nietzsche, we always say.

Paris Match has Amy Winehouse. Le Nouvel Obs has Anders Behring Breivik. Le Parisien, more serious than usual, focuses on famine in the Horn of Africa. Libération flags French hypocrisy on African dictators rich real estate holdings on French soil. And Libé, with the headline, “DSK, the Impossible Return,” notes that Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s friends have given up on the idea he will return and become president, given unfavorable timing and that he’ll have to recuperate from his ordeal even if all charges are dropped. Le Figaro highlights a new effort to slash tax havens to cut the deficit. And Le Monde this afternoon leads on a big surprise jump in the jobless rate, after disappointing figures released last night.

KIOSQUE:
Business could be brisker for this lonely little kiosk under roiling clouds and thunderclaps at Paris Plages. The city’s month-long Seine-side “beach” opened yesterday. Fingers crossed for a bit of sunshine before it closes August 21.
Le Figaro today has a smiling composite of new IMF chief Christine Lagarde, Nicolas Sarkozy, European Commission President José Manuel Barroso, and Angela Merkel, under the triumphal headline “Europe Saves Greece and Reinforces the Euro” after the Brussels summit ran deep into yesterday evening to pull out an agreement. The financial daily Les Echos adds other smiling faces and declares, “Europe Concludes a Historic Accord to Save the Euro.” No smiling politicians for Libération’s cover, which asks “Crisis of the Euro: Who Will Pay?” Le Parisien has a piece on France falling for Twitter, although the French make up only one percent of the world’s tweeps. The Dominique Strauss-Kahn affair – where tweets from the courtroom were the press’s lifeline – is credited with hooking French hacks.
DSK who? France Soir’s cover has another Socialist, François Hollande, putting up big numbers on Nicolas Sarkozy ahead of the 2012 presidential election. “Hollande Crushes Sarkozy,” it declares, with 57 percent for Hollande to 43 percent for the incumbent in an Ifop-France Soir poll.
Almost all the dailies reserve part of their frontpage for a fist-pumping man in yellow, Thomas Voeckler, the unassuming French cyclist who kept the Tour de France leader’s jersey for a tenth day with his heroics on the Col du Galibier yesterday, only three days from Sunday’s finish on the Champs Elysées. No Frenchman has won the race since 1985.
((The kiosks don’t know it yet, but Voeckler finally just lost the yellow jersey to one of Luxembourg’s Schleck brothers, Andy, which was pretty much in the cards. Andy’s bro Frank is second. Voeckler drops to fourth. But a French guy, Pierre Rolland, won today’s stage.))

KIOSQUE:

Business could be brisker for this lonely little kiosk under roiling clouds and thunderclaps at Paris Plages. The city’s month-long Seine-side “beach” opened yesterday. Fingers crossed for a bit of sunshine before it closes August 21.

Le Figaro today has a smiling composite of new IMF chief Christine Lagarde, Nicolas Sarkozy, European Commission President José Manuel Barroso, and Angela Merkel, under the triumphal headline “Europe Saves Greece and Reinforces the Euro” after the Brussels summit ran deep into yesterday evening to pull out an agreement. The financial daily Les Echos adds other smiling faces and declares, “Europe Concludes a Historic Accord to Save the Euro.” No smiling politicians for Libération’s cover, which asks “Crisis of the Euro: Who Will Pay?” Le Parisien has a piece on France falling for Twitter, although the French make up only one percent of the world’s tweeps. The Dominique Strauss-Kahn affair – where tweets from the courtroom were the press’s lifeline – is credited with hooking French hacks.

DSK who? France Soir’s cover has another Socialist, François Hollande, putting up big numbers on Nicolas Sarkozy ahead of the 2012 presidential election. “Hollande Crushes Sarkozy,” it declares, with 57 percent for Hollande to 43 percent for the incumbent in an Ifop-France Soir poll.

Almost all the dailies reserve part of their frontpage for a fist-pumping man in yellow, Thomas Voeckler, the unassuming French cyclist who kept the Tour de France leader’s jersey for a tenth day with his heroics on the Col du Galibier yesterday, only three days from Sunday’s finish on the Champs Elysées. No Frenchman has won the race since 1985.

((The kiosks don’t know it yet, but Voeckler finally just lost the yellow jersey to one of Luxembourg’s Schleck brothers, Andy, which was pretty much in the cards. Andy’s bro Frank is second. Voeckler drops to fourth. But a French guy, Pierre Rolland, won today’s stage.))

KIOSQUE:
"Patience!" headlines Aujourd’hui: the bad weather could go on until the end of the month. But most of the news this morning at this kiosque in Orly Airport is about political fallout from the DSK case. François Hollande, who is now the leading Socialist candidate for the presidency in next year’s elections, appears to have known about the Tristane Banon business (an alleged attempted rape by DSK) back in 2003. Someone floated untrue rumors (there are a lot of those these days that trace back, rumor has it, to the Elysée) that Hollande was going to be called to testify before the police. Now he says he wants to testify asap. Meanwhile Banon’s mother, Anne Mansouret, as we reported on The Daily Beast, says in L’Express and Libération today that she had sex with Dominique Strauss-Kahn in his office at the OECD in 2000 — three years before his alleged assault on her daughter. Banon was also the original source of speculation that Hollande knew about Tristane’s traumas soon after they happened. But she goes out of her way to praise the former head of the Socialist Party in her interview with Libé: “François Hollande is the only human being that I’ve met in politics. He’s a man who is deeply human.” Unlike, say, a rutting chimpanzee.

KIOSQUE:

"Patience!" headlines Aujourd’hui: the bad weather could go on until the end of the month. But most of the news this morning at this kiosque in Orly Airport is about political fallout from the DSK case. François Hollande, who is now the leading Socialist candidate for the presidency in next year’s elections, appears to have known about the Tristane Banon business (an alleged attempted rape by DSK) back in 2003. Someone floated untrue rumors (there are a lot of those these days that trace back, rumor has it, to the Elysée) that Hollande was going to be called to testify before the police. Now he says he wants to testify asap. Meanwhile Banon’s mother, Anne Mansouret, as we reported on The Daily Beast, says in L’Express and Libération today that she had sex with Dominique Strauss-Kahn in his office at the OECD in 2000 — three years before his alleged assault on her daughter. Banon was also the original source of speculation that Hollande knew about Tristane’s traumas soon after they happened. But she goes out of her way to praise the former head of the Socialist Party in her interview with Libé: “François Hollande is the only human being that I’ve met in politics. He’s a man who is deeply human.” Unlike, say, a rutting chimpanzee.

KIOSQUE:
Yes, the weather in Paris still sucks. This picture was taken early afternoon at Place Pereire, but it’s been like this all day. “Weather Like Autumn,” headlined the daily Le Parisien: “Snow in the Alps, Downpours in the West, Violent Winds in the South: Nobody Is Spared by the Bad Weather Today.” But it could be worse. One of the headlines on the front of Le Monde yesterday evening: “Bangkok, Future Atlantis?” It seems the Thai metropolis is sinking into the sea. Libération, meanwhile, focuses on the drought and famine in Somalia. Indeed things could be a lot worse …

KIOSQUE:

Yes, the weather in Paris still sucks. This picture was taken early afternoon at Place Pereire, but it’s been like this all day. “Weather Like Autumn,” headlined the daily Le Parisien: “Snow in the Alps, Downpours in the West, Violent Winds in the South: Nobody Is Spared by the Bad Weather Today.” But it could be worse. One of the headlines on the front of Le Monde yesterday evening: “Bangkok, Future Atlantis?” It seems the Thai metropolis is sinking into the sea. Libération, meanwhile, focuses on the drought and famine in Somalia. Indeed things could be a lot worse …

KIOSQUE:
Actually, this photograph is of a bouquiniste in November 2005, not a kiosque today. But the temperature feels about the same, and we’ve always liked this picture from Rues de Paradis because you have to look at it for a moment before you see the bookseller.
As for today’s news, both Le Figaro and Libération lead with the first skirmishes between Socialist Party presidential hopefuls François Hollande and Martine Aubry. (Are you asleep yet?) Le Parisien looks at the “timid return of vacationers” to Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt: “For the last few days, last-minute reservations have picked up and, on the ground, the vacationers who are there already are enchanted.” Let’s hope.
French news was so slow, in fact, that we picked up a July copy of the resolutely old-school old-left Le Monde Diplomatique, already yellowing on the stands. A very long piece is dedicated to “Grand Hotels, Masters and Valets,” by American scholar Rachel Sherman. Only a few paragraphs touch directly on the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case, although that’s obviously the reason the piece was published. Sherman says it’s no accident that the maid who accused DSK of sexual assault and attempted rape got the support of hotel management: the maids’ union is well represented at the Sofitel. But this affair also illustrates another aspect of hotel work, says Sherman: “the hotel employes are under the authority of the clients as much as they are of their bosses.” Guests are invited to note the least infractions by the help. Many hotels put “mystery clients” in their rooms to test the quality of service. According to Sherman “the chambermaids live in constant fear” of criticism by guests that will give them “bad reputations.” “All know the worst catastrophes lie in the details”: a hole in a towel, a hair in the bathtub. … Or DNA all over the rug, the walls and the maid’s uniform? Sherman doesn’t get into that.

KIOSQUE:

Actually, this photograph is of a bouquiniste in November 2005, not a kiosque today. But the temperature feels about the same, and we’ve always liked this picture from Rues de Paradis because you have to look at it for a moment before you see the bookseller.

As for today’s news, both Le Figaro and Libération lead with the first skirmishes between Socialist Party presidential hopefuls François Hollande and Martine Aubry. (Are you asleep yet?) Le Parisien looks at the “timid return of vacationers” to Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt: “For the last few days, last-minute reservations have picked up and, on the ground, the vacationers who are there already are enchanted.” Let’s hope.

French news was so slow, in fact, that we picked up a July copy of the resolutely old-school old-left Le Monde Diplomatique, already yellowing on the stands. A very long piece is dedicated to “Grand Hotels, Masters and Valets,” by American scholar Rachel Sherman. Only a few paragraphs touch directly on the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case, although that’s obviously the reason the piece was published. Sherman says it’s no accident that the maid who accused DSK of sexual assault and attempted rape got the support of hotel management: the maids’ union is well represented at the Sofitel. But this affair also illustrates another aspect of hotel work, says Sherman: “the hotel employes are under the authority of the clients as much as they are of their bosses.” Guests are invited to note the least infractions by the help. Many hotels put “mystery clients” in their rooms to test the quality of service. According to Sherman “the chambermaids live in constant fear” of criticism by guests that will give them “bad reputations.” “All know the worst catastrophes lie in the details”: a hole in a towel, a hair in the bathtub. … Or DNA all over the rug, the walls and the maid’s uniform? Sherman doesn’t get into that.

KIOSQUE:
Paris doesn’t have a tradition of big Sunday newspapers. The weekend papers come out on Saturday. If you can find a kiosque open at all on Sundays, the only new publications you are likely to come across are Le Journal du Dimanche and Le Parisien (or its sibling Aujourd’hui). So this morning on Avenue des Ternes we had JDD’s coverage of the ongoing monetary crisis — “How to Save the Euro” — and the latest stages of the Tour de France (finally a French rider, Thomas Voeckler, is hanging on to the yellow jersey). Le Parisien offered “The Keys to the DSK Affair,” sort of, and a piece on the corpulent Scottish couple who won the Euro Millions lottery … So we kept looking, and decided to pick up a copy of the racy and not always reliable weekly picture magazine VSD published earlier in the week. The cover promises us that for Anne Sinclair, wife of Dominique Strauss-Kahn “The Hour of Vengeance is At Hand.” But not against DSK, against those who’ve failed to support him.

KIOSQUE:

Paris doesn’t have a tradition of big Sunday newspapers. The weekend papers come out on Saturday. If you can find a kiosque open at all on Sundays, the only new publications you are likely to come across are Le Journal du Dimanche and Le Parisien (or its sibling Aujourd’hui). So this morning on Avenue des Ternes we had JDD’s coverage of the ongoing monetary crisis — “How to Save the Euro” — and the latest stages of the Tour de France (finally a French rider, Thomas Voeckler, is hanging on to the yellow jersey). Le Parisien offered “The Keys to the DSK Affair,” sort of, and a piece on the corpulent Scottish couple who won the Euro Millions lottery … So we kept looking, and decided to pick up a copy of the racy and not always reliable weekly picture magazine VSD published earlier in the week. The cover promises us that for Anne Sinclair, wife of Dominique Strauss-Kahn “The Hour of Vengeance is At Hand.” But not against DSK, against those who’ve failed to support him.